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Physics Professor Paul Halpern Releases New Book

Published on August 4, 2020

Paul Halpern, PhD, Professor of Physics at USciences, has released his new book Synchronicity: The Epic Quest to Understand the Quantum Nature of Cause and Effect published by Basic Books.  

Dr. Halpern tells the little-known story of an unlikely friendship between physicist Wolfgang Pauli and psychoanalyst Carl Jung as they explored the concept of synchronicity, which they believed could link events without cause. 

As Dr. Halpern works his way through the history of the physics of cause and effect, he demonstrates that this centuries-old debate is not only relevant at the smallest scales of particle physics, but also at the largest scales of the cosmos itself. 

From Aristotle’s physics to quantum teleportation, this is the story of the pursuit of interactions that happen faster than the speed of light. Connecting science and culture, Dr. Halpern unpacks the past, present, and future of some of physics’ most outlandish possibilities.

In addition to Synchronicity, Dr. Halpern is the author of fifteen other science books, including The Quantum Labyrinth and Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger’s Cat. Dr. Halpern is the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship and a Fulbright Scholarship, and is a fellow of the American Physical Society.

Praise for Synchronicity: The Epic Quest to Understand the Quantum Nature of cause and Effect

“Paul Halpern engagingly explores the many kinds of connection in the universe, from cause and effect to coincidence, and on to the weirdness of entanglement. After reading Synchronicity, you’ll think twice the next time someone says everything happens for a reason.” 

―Steven Strogatz, author of Infinite Powers 

“Paul Halpern has zeroed in on one of the biggest mysteries in physics: objects with no mechanical linkage somehow act in harmony. He gives it a human face by digging into the Pauli-Jung collaboration-there is nothing else quite like it in the history of science.” 

―George Musser, author of Spooky Action at a Distance

Categories: News, Misher College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Mathematics, Physics and Statistics, Physics, Faculty, Book