PT Professor Helps Write Guidelines on Treating Runner’s Knee

By Colby Gallagher

Published on September 24, 2019

Clinical Practice Guidelines on Patellofemoral PainAfter seven years of collaborative efforts, a new guideline to help treat runner’s knee, an issue that impacts one in four individuals, has been published with a USciences physical therapy professor serving as co-author.

David Logerstedt PT, MPT, MA, PhD, director of the BTE Lab and associate professor of physical therapy, helped write the Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) on Patellofemoral Pain (PFP) in the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. Dr. Logerstedt previously worked on the CPGs for knee ligament and meniscus/articular cartilage and knee injury prevention.

“After the completion of the two original guidelines in 2010, we started to talk about developing the patellofemoral guidelines,” said Dr. Logerstedt. “We started the process in 2012 in identifying authors.”

Throughout the next seven years, the authors completed a publication that includes an exercise program to gradually increase activity, information on reducing PFP in military population, tips on improving a runner’s gait to reduce knee pain and more.

“This allows physical therapists the ability to access the most current evidence based research from clinical course to risk factors to tests and measurements to interventions,” Dr. Logerstedt said. “It will help clinicians to direct their examination and interventions that best serves the patient.”

According to the American Physical Therapy Association, patellofemoral pain or runner’s knee affects one in four of the general population, with women reporting the pain twice as often as men.

Dr. David LogerstedtWith his previous background working on other guidelines related to knee injuries and issues, Dr. Logerstedt was a valued member of the team working to publish the information.

“Beyond the critical day-to-day work of developing a high-quality CPG, Dr. Logerstedt contributed his expertise in CPG design and methodology, and content expertise in knee disorders,” said Christine M. McDonough PT, PhD, ICF-based Clinical Guidelines Editor with the Academy of Orthopaedic Physical Therapy (AOPT). “We are so grateful for his service to the AOPT and to the physical therapy community.”

The field of physical therapy is expected to grow 28% between 2016 and 2026 -- a rate that is much faster than the average growth rate for all occupations -- according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Dr. Logerstedt said statistics show the field is necessary and beneficial to one’s health.

“Of Americans who self report medical conditions, more than 50% report musculoskeletal conditions,” he said. “Problems with activities of daily living are primarily are due to musculoskeletal problems.”

The guidelines hope to target a common area of discomfort and pain for people and provide physical therapists with the tools to tackle the issue.

Categories: News, Samson College of Health Sciences, Department of Physical Therapy, Physical Therapy, Publication