Faculty Research: Climate Change Linked to Rise In Bacterial Infections

By Jenna Pizzi

Published on June 24, 2019

Madeline King PharmDA new study of patient cases presenting with a deadly Vibrio vulnificus bacteria, suggests climate change and warming waters may be the cause of an increased number of infections in areas not previously impacted. The study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine on June 18, 2019, was co-authored by Madeline King PharmD, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy and infectious diseases at USciences’ Philadelphia College of Pharmacy

The report looked at the number of patient cases from individuals who came into contact with the infection after water or shellfish exposure in the Delaware Bay. V Vulnificus is endemic along the southeastern U.S. coast as well as in the Chesapeake Bay, but are rarely reported from the Delaware bay, which is slightly cooler. Reports of infection treated at Cooper Rowan Medical Center rose from one in the eight years prior to 2017 to five during the summers of 2017 and 2018.

This study was featured widely in news media and industry press: 

CBS News

Time

Contagion

The Daily Mail

Inverse

Medscape

Categories: News, Faculty, Health Tip, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, Pharmacy, Publication, Research