USciences Encourages Social Media-Savvy Teens to Turn Healthy Living Ideas into Cash

Written by Lauren Whetzel-Siburkis
Published on October 19, 2015

Teen at podiumMore than $10,000 in scholarships and cash prizes are at stake for local high school students who showcase the most effective health-conscious social media campaigns at the sixth annual Healthy Lifestyles Social Media Competition at University of the Sciences. This year’s event has been rescheduled for Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016, starting at 10 a.m. in the Mayes College of Healthcare Business and Policy at USciences. 

“The idea is for students to come up with a program designed to convince people to make healthier lifestyle decisions, and then develop a social media campaign that helps them communicate their message using popular sites like Facebook and Twitter,” said Richard Minoff, director of the undergraduate program of pharmaceutical and healthcare business at USciences.

Teen at podiumThis competition is open to all high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and both individual and team entries are acceptable. Minoff said campaign themes should inspire individuals of all ages to adopt a healthier lifestyle, such as making better food choices, losing weight, and limiting alcohol consumption. However, students are also encouraged to think outside of the box and come up with their own unique ideas, like raising awareness about the dangers of distracted driving.

All submissions must include a PowerPoint presentation, but students can also incorporate videos, photo galleries, and other tools that take advantage of their respective social media platforms. Target audiences for the presentations will vary based on each particular topic being discussed.

The deadline to submit entries is Nov. 24, and all participants must attend the competition and awards ceremony on Feb. 27 to be eligible for cash prizes and scholarships. For more details regarding the competition’s registration process and rules, click here


Categories: News, Announcement, , Event, USciences, Mayes College, Department of Health Policy, Health Policy, Public Health, Business

Share ArticleShare