Megan Strauss Named Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy

Written by Lauren Whetzel-Siburkis
Published on October 8, 2015

With several years of invaluable clinical experience and fieldwork education, Megan Strauss MS, OTR/L, has been named assistant professor and academic fieldwork coordinator in the Department of Occupational Therapy at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. She comes to the University having worked as an occupational therapist at Therapy Source, Inc., and Weisman Children's Rehabilitation Center.
Megan Strauss

“I believe in the value of hands-on, active learning to develop clinical, professional, and interpersonal skills,” said Strauss. “I am thrilled to take on the challenge of fieldwork coordination and helping students through their fieldwork experiences.”

Strauss’s professional interests include working with families of children with special needs, exploring constraint-induced movement therapy and sensory integration therapy, and fieldwork education. The majority of her field work has been in pediatrics—where she worked closely with children with sensory processing disorders, neurological conditions, autism, attention deficit disorders, and developmental delays, both on land and through aquatic therapy.

At USciences, Strauss will help occupational therapy students build their professional skills through practice and hands-on experience. As an academic fieldwork coordinator, Strauss said she looks forward to enriching students through various fieldwork experiences.

Strauss, of New Egypt, New Jersey, earned her master of occupational therapy and BS in health and occupation degrees from Elizabethtown College. She also continues to work with children privately and through early intervention at Sunny Days Early Childhood Developmental Services, Inc. She is certified in therapeutic listening, Saebo, and Advanced Physical Agent Modalities, as well as has a specialty certificate in Pediatric Aquatic Therapy.


Categories: News, Announcement, Faculty, Academics, Samson College, Department of Occupational Therapy, Occupational Therapy

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