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Student and Faculty Photos on Display at Trust Gallery 4/1
Posted: Wednesday, March 30, 2011
 
On Friday, April 1, 2011, photographs taken by USciences faculty and students will be represented in a special, First Friday exhibit at the Trust Gallery, 249 Arch St. The exhibit, sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Festival and entitled “Science Made Clear: A Collective,” will include artwork submitted by colleges and universities across the city.
 
What is First Friday?

On the First Friday evening of every month, art galleries throughout the city open their doors to the art loving public. You can browse or buy art at the opening receptions and continuing shows. The crowds and the art work are diverse and the streets are filled with art lovers of all kinds who wander among the neighborhood’s 40-plus galleries (most are open from 5 until 9 p.m).

Media: Photography (Nikon 50i Upright Microscope)

Cassandre Cavanaugh BC'12, PH/TX'12 is actively involved in research, working with both Dr. Michael Bruist (Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry), and Dr. Joan Tarloff (Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences). Cavanaugh 's research in Biochemistry focuses on building a special virtual dumbbell RNA that is to be used to compare the stability of the RNA sarcin/ricin domain to standard A-form RNA.

10X Magnification of a Cross Section of Mouse Kidney: This cross section of mouse kidney was stained using Hematoxylin and Eosin staining technique. This is a common staining method used to stain biopsies in medical diagnosis to determine if an area is cancerous. Staining process involves staining the sample with hemalum, which is a complex formed from aluminum ions and oxidized haematoxylin. This colors the nuclei cells blue. Counterstaining the sample with Eosin then colors the remaining structures red, pink and orange.
40X Magnification of a Cross Section of Mouse Kidney: This cross section of mouse kidney was stained using Hematoxylin and Eosin staining technique. This is a common staining method used to stain biopsies in medical diagnosis to determine if an area is cancerous. Staining process involves staining the sample with hemalum, which is a complex formed from aluminum ions and oxidized haematoxylin. This colors the nuclei cells blue. Counterstaining the sample with Eosin then colors the remaining structures red, pink and orange.
10X Magnification of a Mouse Adipose Tissue: This cross section of mouse adipose tissue was stained using Hematoxylin and Eosin staining technique. This is a common staining method used to stain biopsies in medical diagnosis to determine if an area is cancerous. Staining process involves staining the sample with hemalum, which is a complex formed from aluminum ions and oxidized haematoxylin. This colors the nuclei cells blue. Counterstaining the sample with Eosin then colors the remaining structures red, pink and orange.

Media: Photography (Atomic Force Microscope Images)

Name of Creator: Timothy Enright, Marianna Kokoruz, Dr. Alexander Sidorenko, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia
 
Timothy Enright C'10 made the images while performing undergraduate research with Dr. Sidorenko at USciences. The group's focus is in nanochemistry, specifically in the areas of thin polymer films, nanostructured materials, and hybrid ("smart") materials.
PEG Brush Image Description
A polymer brush consists of end-tethered polymer chains attached to a surface. Owning unique properties, they have potential applications in microelectronics, drug delivery, and tailoring surface properties. The picture is a 10 micrometer image of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) brush taken with an Atomic Force Microscope (Innova, Veeco Instruments Inc.). Interestingly, despite one end of the polymer chain being tethered, PEG is still capable for 2D crystallization. The research findings related to this image are published in Enright, T.; Hagaman, D.; Kokoruz, M.; Coleman, N.; Sidorenko, A. "Gradient and Patterned Polymer Brushes by Photoinitiated “Grafting Through” Approach". Polym. Sci. Part B: Polym. Phys (2009), 48, 1616-1622.
The picture is a 50 micrometer image of a neural cell on a pattered polymer brush taken with an Atomic Force Microscope. Surface resistance to protein adsorption and cell/bacterial adhesion is critical for the development of biocompatible devices and materials. In development of (bio)non-fouling surfaces (surfaces repelling proteins and cells) brushes of Polyacrylamide (PAAm) were found to prevent cell adhesion. The image depicts a neural cell that has selectively adhered to a region where a PAAm brush is absent.
 
The research findings related to this image are published in Enright, T.; Hagaman, D.; Kokoruz, M.; Coleman, N.; Sidorenko, A. "Gradient and Patterned Polymer Brushes by Photoinitiated “Grafting Through” Approach". Polym. Sci. Part B: Polym. Phys (2009), 48, 1616-1622.
 
University of the Sciences is a core partner of the Philadelphia Science Festival. To learn more about events USciences is planning for the festival, visit www.usciences.edu/sciencefestival.
 
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