Careers in Medical Laboratory Science

Medical laboratory scientists are in high demand, and government economists expect job growth for medical scientists, to be much faster than the average for all careers through 2020.

The Human Genome Project and research in bioterrorism also have increased demand for medical laboratory scientists. According to Les Krantz’s Jobs Rated Almanac, medical laboratory scientists ranked in the top fifth out of 250 jobs. Criteria for ranking included salary, stress levels, work environment, outlook, security, and physical demands.

Upon completion of the program, you have a wealth of career options. Potential worksites include:

  • Forensic laboratories
  • Hospitals
  • Research clinics
  • Pharmaceutical companies
  • Blood banks
  • Public health clinics
  • Veterinary practices and laboratories
  • Public health organizations
  • U.S. military
  • Volunteer organizations, such as the Peace Corps and Doctors Without Borders
  • Equipment and supply companies

Rewarding Futures

According to the annual salary survey of the Medical Laboratory Observer, 2014 salaries are $59,833 for a Medical Laboratory Scientist.

Professional Connections

Professional groups offer such valuable benefits as networking opportunities, the chance to have a voice in policy discussions, and subscriptions to journals.

Licensure and Certification

Some states will require that you obtain a license. Agencies that certify medical laboratory scientists include:

You may choose to become certified. Certification is the process by which a nongovernmental agency or association grants recognition of competence to an individual who has met certain predetermined qualifications, as specified by that agency or association. Most hospitals require it. Many states only require a certification and not licensing.

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