Psychology Program Research

University of the Sciences' psychology programs combine scientific theory with research practices, so that you can apply what you are learning well before graduation. Because of our smaller student population, we offer many opportunities to do primary investigative research early in your undergraduate program, research that leads to publications and presentations at national meetings. Faculty will encourage these efforts and work closely with you on your projects.

Student researchers

  • Gain valuable experience in laboratory techniques, research conduct and analysis.
  • Collaborate with faculty and classmates in class, in the lab and in the field.
  • Work with commonly used instrumentation and techniques.

Research by students

  • Is ideal preparation for you to continue your education in master’s and doctoral programs
  • Helps develop the skill set of a working scientist while still within the nurturing University environment.
  • Imparts the tools necessary to identify problems and create solutions that will help later in your educational and professional careers.

For detailed information about specific research projects and publications within the psychology programs, see the lab web pages for Dr. Janke or Dr. Moelter.

Also, click here for information about participating in psychology research studies.

Recent National Presentations by Student Researchers

  • Horey K (undergraduate) & Timko CA (faculty) (November 2012). The use of Facebook for coping with suicide. Poster presented at the annual convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, National Harbor, MD.
  • Park, H (undergraduate), Park S (undergraduate), Troup L, & Timko CA (faculty) (November 2012). Perseveration as a measure of cognitive rigidity: A preliminary study. Poster to be presented at the annual convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, National Harbor, MD.
  • Vargas A (undergraduate), Mendelson TB, Caplan AL, & Kirkpatrick JN. (May 2012). Conflict of interest in recent cardiology guidelines vs. other professional society statements. Poster presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Conference (QCOR), Atlanta, GA.
  • Smith GD, Lambert JV (faculty), & Moore Z (undergraduate). (November 2011). Effect of target behavior description on the reliability and accuracy of measurements. Poster presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Maryland Association for Behavior Analysis, Baltimore, MD.
  • Plaksin J (undergraduate), Vaswami D (graduate), Moelter ST (faculty), et al. (May 2011). Catechol-O-methyl transferase Val158Met polymorphism, executive function, and impulsivity in Parkinson’s disease. Poster presented at the 23rd annual Association for Psychological Science Convention, Washington, D.C.
  • Akinyi, C (undergraduate), Schmoyer, C (undergraduate), & Moelter, ST (faculty). (May 2010). Exposure to natural environments may not improve attention and mood. Poster session presented at the 22nd annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.
  • Plaksin J (undergraduate), Stetsko, M (undergraduate), & McGovern M (undergraduate). (May 2010). Analysis of the relationship between humor type and affect. Poster presented at the 22nd annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.
  • Gallo A (undergraduate), Haun GT (undergraduate), & Turner RM (2009, May). Assessing the initial impact of self-reflection strategies on mood. Poster presented at the 21st annual Association for Psychological Sciences Convention, San Francisco, CA.
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